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FrankenReader

Page history last edited by Chris Werry 11 years, 2 months ago

RWS FRANKEN-Reader

 

The FrankenReader is on Blackboard (go to the main RWS100 page) and is in .pdf format. The content of these pdf files is listed below:

Excerpts from rhetoric/composition handbooks you may find useful for teaching 100 and 200


1. Intro to writing/academic discourse

 “Writing as Social Action,” p. 1 – 7. From Writing & Community Action, Thomas Deans. Longman 2003.
■ “Introduction,” p. 7- 26. Issues: Readings in Academic Disciplines, by Dominic Dellicarpellini. Penguin Academic, 2010.  Introduction to academic community, academic writing, why writing/humanities matter, etc.

2.  Sample Charted Texts (Can Also Be Used As Short Texts to Intro Course)
“How Biofuels Could Starve the Poor,” p. 642 – 655 (Runge & Senauer). In Issues: Readings in Academic Disciplines, by Dominic Dellicarpellini.
■ “
Does/Says Analysis of Turner’s ‘Playing with Our Food.’”  Bean et al., pages 25 – 31.  In Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings, by John Bean et al., Pearson 2007. 

“Protecting Freedom of Expression at Harvard,” plus “A Curse & a Blessing” (charted analysis of Bok). In Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al. Pages 118 – 123.
“Letter to the Editor on Climate Story,” (charted) page 235 – 236 of Writing Today, by Johnson-Sheehan and Paine. Pearson 2010.
■ Sample analysis of moves in a short text: “An Overview: An Examination of an Argument.” 83 – 88. The Little, Brown Reader. Stubbs et al., Longman 2003.

 

3. Intro to Argument: Identifying, Reading, & Interpreting Argument

■ “An Introduction to the Study of Argument,” page 3 – 15. In A Rhetoric of Argument, Fahnestock & Secor, McGraw Hill 2004.
■ “Reading Arguments,” page 23 – 49. In Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings, by John Bean et al., Pearson 2007.

■ “Classical elements of arguments,” PAGE 19 – 29, Stratagems: Arguing Issues for Writers, Stein et al, Fountainhead, 2008.

■ “Written Arguments,” PAGE 44 – 53, Stratagems: Arguing Issues for Writers, Stein et al, Fountainhead, 2008.

■ “Introduction to Argument & Persuasion,” page 1- 20, Reading & Writing Short Arguments, William Vesterman, 4th edition, McGraw Hill 2003.

 

4. Pre-reading, Annotating, Critical Reading

■ “How to Mark a Book,” Mortimer Adler. In Subject & Strategy, p. 220 – 225, Bedford St. Martins, 2008, Paul Escholz & Alfred Rosa.

■ Ellen Quandahl, “How to Do Things With Texts.”

■ “Getting the Most Out of Your Reading,” pages 2 – 14. Language Awareness, Eschholz et al. Bedford St. Martins, 2009.

■ Reading Arguments: Thinking Like a Critic,” pages 28 – 49. Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric & Reader. Goshgarian & Krueger, Pearson 2009.

■ “Critical Literacy: The Skills to Live an Examined Life,” p 49 – 69. Composing a Civic Life, Michael Berndt and Amy Muse, Pearson 2004. 

“A Writer Reads,” pages 2 – 17. The Little, Brown Reader. Stubbs et al., Longman 2003.

 

5. Evidence & Appeals
“What Counts as Evidence,” pages 493 – 513 of Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al.
■ “Using Evidence: Thinking Like an Advocate.” Pages 169 – 192, Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric & Reader. Goshgarian & Krueger, Pearson 2009.

6. Strategies & Rhetorical Analysis

■ Selzer, Jack. "Rhetorical Analysis: Understanding How Texts Persuade Readers." What Writing Does and How It Does It. Ed. Charles Bazerman and Paul Prior. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2004. 279-308.
■ “Rhetorical Analysis” In Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al. Pages 95 - 129.
■ “Style in Arguments,” page 417 – 439, Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al.

■ Appeals, politics and fallacies. PAGE 129 – 137 Stratagems: Arguing Issues for Writers, Stein et al, Fountainhead, 2008.

■ “Writing An Analysis of An Argument,” pages 116 – 132, From Critical Thinking to Argument, Barnet & Bedau, Bedford St. Martins, second edition, 2008.

■ “Rhetorical Analyses,” page 167 – 194, in Writing Today, by Johnson-Sheehan and Paine. Pearson 2010.

 

7. Organization: Writing Introductions & Conclusions

■ “Drafting Introductions & Conclusions,” pp 393 – 397, Writing Today, by Johnson-Sheehan and Paine. Pearson 2010.

Introductions, Body Paragraphs, Conclusions.  Composing a Civic Life, page 69 – 73. Michael Berndt and Amy Muse, Pearson 2004.
■ Graff, “How to Write an Argument: What Students & Teachers Really Need to Know.” In Language Awareness, Eschholz et al. Bedford St. Martins, 2009, p. 124 – 126.

 

8. Fallacies

■ “Propaganda: How Not to Be Bamboozled,” page 149 – 159, Language Awareness, Eschholz et al. Bedford St. Martins, 2009.

■ “Fallacies of Argument,” page 515 – 535, Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al.

■ “Fallacies,” Fahnestock & Secor, pages 65 - 71. In A Rhetoric of Argument, Fahnestock & Secor, McGraw Hill 2004.

 

9. Visual Rhetoric

■ “Visual Rhetoric for Writing Teachers: Using Documentaries to Develop Student Awareness of Rhetorical Elements.” In Writing the Visual, edited by Carol David and Anne Richards. Parlor Press, 2008.

■ “Visual Arguments,” page 441 – 461, Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford et al.

■ “Conducting Visual Arguments,” Bean et al., page 161 – 183.  In Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings, by John Bean et al., Pearson 2007.

■ “Creating Visual & Oral Argument,” pages 198 - 221 of Essentials of Argument, Nancy Wood, Pearson 2005.

■ “Visual Design,” chapter 19 Trimbur, The Call to Write. Nice intro to understanding visual design.

 

 

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